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The Way I See It!

I am an Ultra-Conservative, Alpha-Male, True Authentic Leader, Type "C" Personality, who is very active in my community; whether it is donating time, clothes or money for Project Concern or going to Common Council meetings and voicing my opinions. As a blogger, I intend to provide a different viewpoint "The way I see it!" on various world, national and local issues with a few helpful tips & tidbits sprinkled in.

Raw Meat Sandwiches

Christmas, Food, Health

In my family, every Christmas until about 10 years ago we would have raw ground beef with onions, salt and pepper server on a cracker.  And it was good.  I don’t remember anyone getting sick over the years, however as the grandparents passed away, my family kind of just stopped doing it.

 

'Cannibal sandwiches' sicken Wisconsin residents

 

"Cannibal sandwiches," an appetizer featuring raw, lean ground beef served on cocktail bread, may be a Wisconsin tradition, but they are not safe, health officials said, noting that more than a dozen people became ill after consuming them last holiday season.

 

Health officials confirmed four cases tied to E. coli bacteria and 13 likely cases in people who ate the sandwiches at several gatherings late last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said a report issued this week.  The meat came from a Watertown market that later recalled more than 2,500 pounds of meat.

 

Cannibal sandwiches were tied to outbreaks in Wisconsin in 1972, 1978 and 1994.  The appetizer, also called "tiger meat," "steak tartare" or simply "ground beef," is usually a simple dish of lean ground meat seasoned with salt and pepper on rye cocktail bread with sliced raw onion, said Milwaukee historian John Gurda, who served it at his 1977 wedding reception.  Occasionally, a raw egg will be mixed with the meat.

 

Cannibal sandwiches have been a festive dish in German, Polish and other ethnic communities in the Milwaukee area since the 19th century, Gurda said.  The 66-year-old said it was once common to see them at wedding receptions, meals following funerals and Christmas and New Year's Eve parties.  The dish has become less common in recent years with greater awareness of the risks of uncooked meat and fewer people eating beef, but Gurda said he still runs into it.

 

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/cannibal-sandwiches-sicken-wisconsin-residents-2D11703492

 

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