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An Author's Perspective

Featuring new fiction from Ken Brosky and author authors, as well as occasional political commentary whenever something really important happens. But mostly fiction.

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Missing Paul Samuelson

paul samuelson, ken brosky, quinten tarrantino, regulated capitalism, free market, the atlantic

I thought it would be worth sharing an interview with Paul Samuelson, the late economist who died earlier this year. The economics world is really going to miss him, not just for his ideas but also the fact that he's such a fantastic character. He speaks his mind, and you can see that in the interview.

Click here for part one.

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"Columbus, Indians and Human Progress"

howard zinn, a people's history of the united states, columbus, iroquois, indians, america, discovery, colonialism

In honor of historian Howard Zinn--who recently passed away--I thought it would be interesting to share passages from his best-selling A People's History of the United States. Unlike the history books we grew up with in school, A People's History doesn't sugarcoat any of the events that have defined our nation from its inception. It's been regarded, wrongly, as being "unpatriotic," whatever that may mean. But the goal of Zinn's book was to present certain truths that are simply omitted in our history classes, and it's worth reading if you haven't done so already. One of the best aspects of Zinn's history book is his use of writing from people living during each period in our country's history, and that's what I'm going to share.

So let's start with Chapter 1: Columbus, Indians and Human Progress. What happened after Columbus "discovered" the Indies? Well, since the Indians were so welcoming and obviously inferior, they were immediately put to work as slaves. It quickly reached a point where Spaniards, uninterested in walking short distances, simply rode Indians like horses. A priest named Bartolome de las Casas' writes:

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