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An Author's Perspective

Featuring new fiction from Ken Brosky and author authors, as well as occasional political commentary whenever something really important happens. But mostly fiction.

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"Drawing the Color Line"

a people's history of the united states, howard zinn, drawing the color line, bacon's rebellion, slaves, servants, ken brosky

In honor of historian Howard Zinn--who recently passed away--I thought it would be interesting to share passages from his best-selling A People's History of the United States. Unlike the history books we grew up with in school, A People's History doesn't sugarcoat any of the events that have defined our nation from its inception. It's been regarded, wrongly, as being "unpatriotic," whatever that may mean. But the goal of Zinn's book was to present certain truths that are simply omitted in our history classes, and it's worth reading if you haven't done so already. One of the best aspects of Zinn's history book is his use of writing from people living during each period in our country's history, and that's what I'm going to share.

On to chapter 2. We all know our founding fathers were lovers of slaves. For Jefferson, this meant, literally, "loving" slaves in the way a married couple might do after a romantic dinner. For Madison, "loving" the slaves was purely economical, as he was fond of bragging that each slave he owned easily brought in $25 per year (quite a lot back then!).

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"Persons of Mean and Vile Condition"

people's history of the united states, howard zinn, persons of mean and vile condition, black slaves, indians, ken brosky

In honor of historian Howard Zinn--who recently passed away--I thought it would be interesting to share passages from his best-selling A People's History of the United States. Unlike the history books we grew up with in school, A People's History doesn't sugarcoat any of the events that have defined our nation from its inception. It's been regarded, wrongly, as being "unpatriotic," whatever that may mean. But the goal of Zinn's book was to present certain truths that are simply omitted in our history classes, and it's worth reading if you haven't done so already. One of the best aspects of Zinn's history book is his use of writing from people living during each period in our country's history, and that's what I'm going to share.

On to chapter 3, Persons of Mean and Vile Condition. Following Bacon's rebellion, there was fear rising in the colonies that populism might encroach upon the wealth of the few landowners of the time. Bacon's rebellion (which started as a response to Indian policies at the time) was so popular, in fact, that Virginia's governor was truly nervous.

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"Tyranny is Tyranny"

people's history of the united states, howard zinn, capitalism, u.s. independence, america, declaration of independence, ken brosky

In honor of historian Howard Zinn--who recently passed away--I thought it would be interesting to share passages from his best-selling A People's History of the United States. Unlike the history books we grew up with in school, A People's History doesn't sugarcoat any of the events that have defined our nation from its inception. It's been regarded, wrongly, as being "unpatriotic," whatever that may mean. But the goal of Zinn's book was to present certain truths that are simply omitted in our history classes, and it's worth reading if you haven't done so already. One of the best aspects of Zinn's history book is his use of writing from people living during each period in our country's history, and that's what I'm going to share.

On to chapter 4, "Tyranny is Tyranny." England, attempting to pay of its war debts was ticking off quite a few people over its attempts to sink its fingers into the colonies. It was only a matter of time before people of all classes began fighting back.

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"A Kind of Revolution"

howard zinn, a people's history of the united states, history, american history, capitalism, slavery, bill of rights, ken brosky

In honor of historian Howard Zinn--who recently passed away--I thought it would be interesting to share passages from his best-selling A People's History of the United States. Unlike the history books we grew up with in school, A People's History doesn't sugarcoat any of the events that have defined our nation from its inception. It's been regarded, wrongly, as being "unpatriotic," whatever that may mean. But the goal of Zinn's book was to present certain truths that are simply omitted in our history classes, and it's worth reading if you haven't done so already. One of the best aspects of Zinn's history book is his use of writing from people living during each period in our country's history, and that's what I'm going to share.

On to Chapter 5, "A Kind of Revolution," in which our founding fathers are desperately trying to figure out a way to incite rebellion against England without getting the lower classes so upset that they'll go and start demanding pesky rights like "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." Or the right to vote. Or, in the case of slaves, the right to not be tortured.

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